REMINDER NOT TO TAG TRIGGERING THINGS WITH TW: OR TRIGGER WARNING: FIRST

madarakifran:

but why not, you ask???? let me tell you

because tumblr saviour is fickle and tends to break or slow down when having too many things added to its blacklist.

if i have #food blocked, and you tag things with #tw food or #tw: food or #trigger warning: food or #blacklist: food or however, then i have to add all of those to the list for the same thing!! and if i only have 4 things to block that’s already 16 items on my blacklist!! wow

which will cause the posts to take longer to be blocked and cause detriment to the user.

how do we fix this??

by tagging with the blacklisted item first!

tagging things with #food tw and #food blacklist etc will catch all those posts with me only having #food blacklisted and takes just as much time!

it’s a way better and more efficient way of making things easier on folks with triggers or with things that upset or bother them! and it’d be real appreciated if put more into practice.

thank u

via laffbending · originally by talaem

URGENT: Google privacy policy change

brofisting:

fuckyeahfeminists:

Just got this in an email

In just a few hours, new policies will take effect at Google, endangering your privacy.

Tech publication Gizmodo reports, “things you could do in relative anonymity today [like your web searches], will be explicitly associated with your name, your face, your phone number come March 1st.” And this applies retro-actively if you don’t act today.

You can protect yourself in just 1 minute! Click here for a step-by-step guide to protecting your privacy from Google’s changes.

sharing with my followers because your privacy matters! They had searches from 2008…even showed which pages of which Google Books I viewed and when…spooky.

Remember to do this, yo!

via morismako · originally by fuckyeahfeminists

kaikamahine:

It’s Official: Google Is Evil Now

mustcockblock:

bellafaim:

In a radical privacy policy shift, Google announced today that it will begin tracking users across all services—email, Search, YouTube and more—sharing information with no option to opt out. The change was announced in a blog post today, and will go into effect March 1.

wtf do people ever read these things

Transparency and choice

People have different privacy concerns. Our goal is to be clear about what information we collect, so that you can make meaningful choices about how it is used. For example, you can:

  • Review and control certain types of information tied to your Google Account by using Google Dashboard.
  • View and edit your ads preferences, such as which categories might interest you, using the Ads Preferences Manager. You can also opt out of certain Google advertising services here.
  • Use our editor to see and adjust how your Google Profile appears to particular individuals.
  • Control who you share information with.
  • Take information out of many of our services.

You may also set your browser to block all cookies, including cookies associated with our services, or to indicate when a cookie is being set by us. However, it’s important to remember that many of our services may not function properly if your cookies are disabled. For example, we may not remember your language preferences.

and then

  • We will share personal information with companies, organizations or individuals outside of Google when we have your consent to do so. We require opt-in consent for the sharing of any sensitive personal information.

the actual policy

via astroprojection · originally by Gizmodo

How to find textbooks online for free: a post.

obsessionfull:

Textbooks are fucking expensive, and if your professor doesn’t require a physical copy (most don’t - they just want you to have the book at hand. Or maybe even not. Some professors literally give no fucks about whether you have the book or not) and you don’t mind having your copy as an electronic copy - this is the post for you!

Most textbook companies put out new editions every year or so even though there isn’t really that much new information. Sometimes they’ll eliminate questions if it’s something like a math or chemistry book or they’ll add in a few sentences about updated legislation (the professor I work for teaches human sexuality, and the newest edition of the book she uses included the 2009 decision to allow same-sex couples have hospital visitation rights). These new editions are pointless and only created to make the textbook company money and to cut down on students selling to each other. You’re going to ignore that. We love older editions. Make sure when you’re searching on the following sites that you don’t include the edition number to give you more search results. If one with your edition comes up - great! If not, you can usually stick to something one to three editions behind without any major changes.

Sites you should be searching:

  • FilesTube - FilesTube searches THE ENTIRE INTERNET for files uploaded to file-sharing websites such as MegaUpload, Mediafire, or WuUpload. Sometimes people will upload pdf files of your textbook. This is always an important first search.
  • Google Books - You usually won’t find your textbook on Google Books, but it’s always worth a look. Sometimes pages are missing because it’s only a preview of the book, but again - always worth a look.
  • Scribd - People upload documents to Scribd and by becoming a member (free!) or connecting through Facebook (if you’re lazy!), you can download whatever files you may find. This sometimes includes textbooks.
  • BookBoon - website specifically for finding pdf versions of textbooks
  • Curriki - free open source materials
  • Flat World Knowledge - free business, humanities, and science textbooks
  • California Learning Resource Network
  • Open Culture
  • Community College Consortium for Open Educational Resources
  • TorrentScan - textbooks are also uploaded to torrent sites in some cases - you may as well check.
  • If push comes to shove, you can try variations of googling “textbook name torrent” or “textbook name download” or “textbook name download free.” Sometimes things pop up and I never would have known about them.

I’ve found all 8 of my textbooks for this term (19 credit hours, six classes) through one of the methods above. I’m not even going to look at retail prices, but checking BigWords.com (which, if you want to buy your books/can’t find them anywhere with one of the previous methods, will give you the cheapest price on the internet), I saved $497.87 by doing this. It takes time, but it’s definitely worth almost $500 worth of time. If you know of more ways to find free textbooks - please let me know!